physiology

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Post Workout Recovery Tips

Post Workout Recovery DrinkMany of us enjoy riding hard: climbing steep grades, pushing huge gears on the flats and trying to put our riding buddies into difficulty at every opportunity.  But that desire, along with unusually strong work ethic possessed my most cyclists can be a doorway to damnation: overtraining can rear its ugly head.  The key to preventing overtraining, as well as seeing marked improvement may not be your workouts, but what you do in between them.

Check out the post recovery tips after the break and learn how to get stronger and faster by resting and recovering harder.
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By |August 31st, 2015|climbing, Coaching, group riding, Motivation, racing, Training|0 Comments

Breaking Through The Cycling Plateau (Podcast #61)

Cycling plateauWhen your training is going great, nothing can crush your motivation like hitting a cycling plateau.  Those weeks where you just can’t seem to find a couple more watts, a couple more tenths of a MPH, or a few more seconds on that climb can be hugely demoralizing.  But you have to realize that plateaus are a normal part of training progression and that progression can’t progress forever in a linear fashion.

In this podcast, I’ll teach you a couple of important things.  You’ll learn the questions to ask to determine if you’ve sabotaged your own fitness gains or if you’re truly stuck on a cycling plateau.  If your fitness is stagnant, you’ll find out how to roll with the situation and break through the plateau.

Click through for the show notes, and I encourage you to subscribe to the Tailwind Coaching Newsletter, because I’ll be providing you with a series of workouts to help you punch through your cycling plateau!

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By |August 14th, 2015|Coaching, Motivation, physiology, podcast|0 Comments

Maintaining Strength Gains During The Season (Podcast #60)

Cycling strength trainingIt’s no secret that cycling requires strength: leg strength, arm and shoulder girdle strength and core strength (and stability) are often overlooked parts of cycling prowess.  I’ve personally seen the benefits of combining moderate strength training with cycling, and I’ve seen clients, athletes and patients benefit greatly from increased strength.

“But cycling is and aerobic sport” I hear you cry.  You’re 100% right, cycling (aside from track sprinting) is predicated on aerobic conditioning and capacity.  However, no sport can exist in a strength vacuum;, and cycling is no exception; lack of strength (especially functional strength) is a short road to injury and underperformance.  Your body needs strength and stability to be able to efficiently utilize its aerobic capacity.  The problem with strength and stability is that it’s exactly like your aerobic capacity in the idea that if you don’t use it you lose it.  I’ve talked about strength training and building strength in weightlifting for cyclists part 1 and part 2, and detailed in my Raw Strength Modular training plan, but an important part of strength training is maintaining the gains made during those winter sessions.  That can be tough for a couple reasons, which I’ll explore in today’s podcast.

Click through for the show notes and learn how to maintain those winter strength gains through the year and set yourself up for even bigger gains next year.
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By |July 30th, 2015|Biohacking, Coaching, physiology, podcast, Strength training|0 Comments

Coaching Q&A – Ways to Boost Your Training Outcomes (Podcast #58)

Boosting Training Outcomes - Podcast 58This time of year, the focus of your questions has turned from how to get strong and fit for upcoming events to wringing the most out of your training time.  If you are anything like the 99% of cyclists for whom riding a bike isn’t a job, you have limited time to train and need to get the most out of each hour. I’ll wager that these questions that I’m getting will apply to many of you out there.  It’s true that no question is a stupid one, and since there’s a lot of valuable information in each of the topics I’ll talk about, I’ve put them together into a podcast intended to help you boost your training outcomes.

In this episode of the Tailwind Coaching Podcast, I’ll explain how you can boost your fitness and increase your training outcomes with some simple techniques.  After the jump, you’ll be able to peruse the show notes and read a synopsis of what’s talked about in this episode.

Don’t forget to hit the like and share buttons on the left to share this information with your friend, group ride buddies and teammates!

Now, learn how to boost your training outcomes with these simple tips:

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Ride Stronger: VO2 Max Repeatability Workouts

20090906000556_bicycle-racerAmong the many weapons in the armament of the cyclist who wants to ride stronger, one of the least practiced and most important is VO2 max repeatability.  The ability to accelerate and push your body to the limits, recover at threshold and repeat that process over and over is one of the most versatile and important skills for a cyclist to possess.  It’s also the one that’s almost always lacking in the cyclists that I consult with or coach, and it’s one I drill home in my training plans.

The real question most people follow up with is “why?”

Before I answer, first let’s delve into VO2 max a little bit.  For our purposes, a VO2 max level effort (or a Zone 5/Z5 effort) is a suprathreshold effort that is sustainable for around 3-8 minutes (depending on the intensity of the effort.)  It is a mixture of aerobic and anaerobic energy production and is most often used in pursuits, attacks, bridging small gaps and short climbs.  By the numbers, it’s an 8 to an 8.5/10 on an RPE scale, 105%-120% of Functional Threshold Power and >105% Lactate Threshold Heart Rate.

After the jump, I’ll give you some more detailed information and a couple workouts to help you build your Zone 5 Repeatability (Z5R) ability.

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By |June 1st, 2015|climbing, Coaching, Training|Comments Off on Ride Stronger: VO2 Max Repeatability Workouts